22 RB transport

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martyn williams
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22 RB transport

Post #1 by martyn williams » Wed Nov 16, 2011 10:32 pm

Scanned this from my L C Lewis book.
This is the way that I remember the RB 's being transported by Short Bros in the 1960's.Don't think this would be allowed these days.
Click on photo to enlarge.
Martyn
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Re: 22 RB transport

Post #2 by librarian62 » Thu Nov 17, 2011 2:14 am

Look's like it got the RB in-and-out of some tight places in a hurry. :dizzy: That's what I like about 3/4 yd. machines. They are more easily trucked than larger machines. Some one-yard machines are like that also. :rockon:


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Re: 22 RB transport

Post #3 by martyn williams » Thu Nov 17, 2011 6:24 pm

Hello Kevin
This used to be a common event as the cranes were moved between sites such as coal mines. I can remember one instance in my home town,Mountain Ash.Before the bridge was widened,it was a very tight turn at the road junction with the end of the jib nearly in the local banks window :lol:
Also on the older 4 in line lowloaders, the RB's were transported with the tracks across the bed of the lowloader and not in line.
Martyn


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Re: 22 RB transport

Post #4 by librarian62 » Thu Nov 17, 2011 8:34 pm

I have seen the "tracks across the bed" trick in some Aussie and UK pics. Never seen it here. But I do imagine it did happen a lot in Texas oil fields....far from the highway. :wave:

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Re: 22 RB transport

Post #5 by modelman093 » Thu Nov 17, 2011 10:08 pm

B100 LOADER wrote:Scanned this from my L C Lewis book.
This is the way that I remember the RB 's being transported by Short Bros in the 1960's.Don't think this would be allowed these days.
Click on photo to enlarge.
Martyn


Back in the 60's when I worked for Beck and Pollitzer it was quite usual to carry smaller navvies either with the jib over the cab or out over the back using four-in-line Knock Out Back Axle (KOBA) trailers - hard work with jacks and timbers or loading "over the side" which required a degree skill and nerve - no hydraulic ramps or detachable goose necks in those days.
As well as speed and convenience there was another reason - the Construction and Use regulations. Here my memory is a bit vague but basically one was able to carry an abnormal load under C&U regs so long as it was "indivisible". This meant that if the top jib section or even the bucket was detached it could not legally be carried on the same trailer and a second vehicle would have to be employed (and paid for).
Another quirk of the C&U regs at that time was the prohibition of the use of "jeep dollies" to spread the load - the regs prohibited pulling two trailers (unless you were a travelling showman or threshing contractor) and those in power decided that a dolly was a trailer.
For heavier stuff Category 1,2 and 3 had not been invented then there was just Special Types that involved weeks of discussion with the then Ministry of Transport, County Surveyors departments, GPO/Post Office Telephones and every Constabulary along the route some of which were an absolute nightmare to deal with (West Midlands comes to mind!) Strangely enough, considering the density of traffic and the road system the Met were one of the best - the B8 Map Room presided over one L.M and his crew was always helpful. You had to submit a route - by Telex in those days - (they were not allowed to give you one) which, if it was a bit wide of the mark, would produce a phone call along the lines of "what on earth do think you are doing why not...........!"
Route planning was interesting with the London A-Z having several instances of roads being shown as going over railway lines when the actually went under them and the bridge that takes the rail lines from Victoria Station over the Embankment and the Thames having different height markings in each direction and both being inaccurate as a result of road resurfacing!
Happy Days!
Angus


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Re: 22 RB transport

Post #6 by martyn williams » Thu Nov 17, 2011 10:17 pm

Hello Angus
I can remember them unloading of the RB's over the side. I can still remember the twanging of the jib ropes as they were unloaded using rail sleepers and packing.Those cranes were up and running unloading wagons in no time. :lol:
I wish I had taken photos in those days.What makes me mad is that I had a super 8 cine camera then :dizzy:
It would have made an interesting record of the work the 22's did.
Martyn

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Re: 22 RB transport

Post #7 by FOWLER MAN » Thu Nov 17, 2011 11:26 pm

librarian62 wrote:I have seen the "tracks across the bed" trick in some Aussie and UK pics. Never seen it here. But I do imagine it did happen a lot in Texas oil fields....far from the highway. :wave:


Hi,
I loaded many navies over the side, and D8s too. We often carried navvies between collierys cross carage and never stripped the jib. One Foden low loader we used to hire had a trailer so short there was no room to turn a standard 22 RB round on the bed.
It was allways a nightmare squeezing round lamp posts on the narrow valley roads. They were allways positioned right on the edge of the pavements so you couldn't squeeze a wide crosscariage load between them and on comming traffic.
Thats when flashing beakons and marker boards were just starting to appear, and with police clearance we provided our own escort,you'd be in the middle of the road with your headlights on trying to hold the traffic, and half of them would wave back and shout, "your lights are on." :doh:
I once carried a 38 RB cross carage on a short move on the "Cambrian Scammell" pictured in "South Wales Lowloaders from 60s & 70S on here, which I occasionaly drove.
For those who know the area the move was from Onllwyn to Seven Sisters, bit tight the Seven Sisters end. :lol:
Fred


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Re: 22 RB transport

Post #8 by tim » Thu Nov 17, 2011 11:43 pm

Highwayman with Scammell 4-in line trailer,19 RB side saddle with jib on.
sb3.jpg
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Re: 22 RB transport

Post #9 by FOWLER MAN » Fri Nov 18, 2011 12:02 am

tim wrote:Highwayman with Scammell 4-in line trailer,19 RB side saddle with jib on.
sb3.jpg


Hi Tim,
Great pic. I remember them well, don't recognise the faces though.
"Thanks."
Fred


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Re: 22 RB transport

Post #10 by martyn williams » Fri Nov 18, 2011 11:56 am

That is a great photo Tim :thumbup: When you compare todays plant movements to those days,that 19RB looks big on that lowloader,with a 19 on todays lowloader it will look a small load. My uncle Jack used to work for Hills transport.He used to work a Saturday morning shift,sometimes I used to go with him on jobs in the area in his LAD tipper.I must have been around 8 years old.
Hills were based at Abercwmboi next to the Phurnacite plant.Short bros lowloaders were often loaded oposite Hills workshops as the 22 RBs were transported between the local pits and the workshop in Hirwaun.Great times.
Martyn
Guess that photo would be late 1950's ?


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